Journal of English Language and Pedagogy https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP <table cellpadding="2"><tbody align="top"><tr><td width="100px">Journal Title</td><td><strong>: <a href="/index.php/ELP" target="_blank"><strong>Journal of English Language and Pedagogy</strong></a><br /></strong></td></tr><tr><td>ISSN</td><td><strong>: <strong><a title="issn" href="http://u.lipi.go.id/1461218763" target="_blank"><span>2527-3655</span></a> (print) | <a title="issn" href="http://u.lipi.go.id/1490770996" target="_blank"><span>2579-8782</span></a> (online)</strong></strong></td></tr><tr><td>DOI Prefix</td><td><strong>: Prefix 10.36597 </strong>by <img src="http://ijain.org/public/site/images/apranolo/Crossref_Logo_Stacked_RGB_SMALL.png" alt="" height="14" /></td></tr><tr><td>Editor in Chief</td><td><strong>: <a href="http://sinta2.ristekdikti.go.id/authors/detail?id=6116888&amp;view=overview" target="_blank">Hanandyo Dardjito</a><strong></strong><br /></strong></td></tr><tr><td>Publisher</td><td><strong>: <a href="http://mpd.ustjogja.ac.id/index.html" target="_blank">Direktorat Pascasarjana Pendidikan, Universitas Sarjanawiyata Tamansiswa</a><strong></strong></strong></td></tr><tr><td>Frequency</td><td><strong>: <a href="/index.php/ELP/issue/archive" target="_blank">2 issues per year</a></strong></td></tr><tr><td valign="top">Citation Analysis</td><td><strong>: <a href="http://sinta.ristekbrin.go.id/journals/detail?id=5970" target="_blank">Sinta</a> | <a href="https://scholar.google.co.id/citations?hl=id&amp;user=fBKlwq4AAAAJ">Google Scholar</a> | <a href="http://garuda.ristekbrin.go.id/journal/view/16778" target="_blank">Garuda</a><br /></strong></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><p align="justify"><strong><strong>Journal of English Language and Pedagogy</strong></strong> is an official scientific journal of the Direktorat Pascasarjana Pendidikan, Universitas Sarjanawiyata Tamansiswa, Indonesia. <strong><span><strong><strong>Journal of English Language and Pedagogy</strong></strong> </span></strong><span>is a refereed publication devoted to research articles, and reports concerned with the teaching and learning of English, language in education, language planning, language testing, curriculum design and material development, multilingualism and multilingual education, discourse analysis, and translation.</span> The Journal is published twice a year (July and December). </p> Direktorat Pascasarjana Pendidikan, Universitas Sarjanawiyata Tamansiswa en-US Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2527-3655 A grammatical error analysis in writing among the second semester students of management department of STIE SBI https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/5307 <p>This research aims at describing the grammatical errors that happen in the final assignment of second-semester students of Management Department of STIE SBI. Two research questions are formulated in this study. They are (1) What are grammatical errors in writing made by second-semester students of Management Department of STIE SBI? and (2) What are the possible causes or sources of those errors? The research study is classified into a descriptive study. The data source was collected from the students’ writing of the second semester. The key instrument used in this research is the researcher and writing result. The researcher used Dulay’s, Burt, and Krashen theory in analyzing the data. As the supplementary tools of the instruments, some forms of data sheets were used during the research analysis. There were two kinds of data: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative data were presented in the form of frequency charts for each category of surface strategy taxonomy and comparative analysis. Then, the qualitative data described each category that occurred in the students’ writing. The researcher described the situation about the occurrence of the errors in the students’ writing. Based on the analysis of the grammatical errors, four types of errors were found. The most frequent error was committed in misformation (47.01%). The second highest frequency of error occurrence was an addition (29.61%). The third percentage of grammatical error in writing was an omission which was 176 times of occurrence (21.89%). The least percentage of students’ error was misordering. The students only committed 12 errors (1.49%) in their writing. Based on the result, it is figured out that the students still have difficulties in learning grammatical structures in the writing process.</p> Bonifasia Ekta Fima Natalia Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-11-23 2020-11-23 3 2 1 10 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.5307 Google classroom as an alternative media of reading logs in a reading course https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/8910 <p>This research generally aims to identify the reading skills and interest of the semester 1 students of the English Department, Universitas Sarjanawiyata Tamansiswa. The specific objective of the research is to formulate a procedure for using Google classroom as an alternative media for reading logs in reading subjects. The reading subject is chosen because reading is a compulsory subject and a prerequisite for the following courses. This research applied a descriptive-qualitative approach. Data collection was carried out using observation, questionnaires, and interviews. The research began with data collection regarding the students’ reading skills, interest, as well as the relevant facilities in the google classroom as reading logs in the reading subject. The data collected were then analyzed, linked, and developed according to the lecture activities in the reading subject. Interviews were conducted to strengthen and complement findings on how google classroom could be used as an alternative media for reading logs in reading subjects.</p> Laksmi Widyarini Afria Dian Prastanti Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-10-10 2020-10-10 3 2 11 16 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.8910 Elementary EFL teachers’ perceptions on code-switching in primary learning contexts https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/7236 <p class="Els-Abstract-text"><span>In this 21st century teaching and learning, there is an intense debate involving language experts whether code-switching should be integrated into EFL learning contexts or not. The supporters of the L2 believed that intense training in the target language will enable EFL learners to be more proficient target language users. While the L1 experts allowed EFL teachers to apply their mother tongue while delivering the teaching-learning materials in order to deliver their teaching-learning instructions clearly for the learners. In line with this contradictory paradigm, EFL teachers need to implement the first language more judiciously in order to preserve learners’ first language and acquire their target language competencies fully. This study attempted to discover Elementary EFL teachers’ perceptions of the use of code-switching in primary learning contexts. This study utilized narrative inquiry utilizing one research instrument, open-ended interview questions to discover Elementary EFL teachers’ perceptions regarding the utilization of code-switching in primary learning contexts. The participants involving in this study were EFL teachers working in Demangan Baru 1 Elementary School, Yogyakarta. Findings from this study revealed that code-switching did not only help EFL teachers to deliver particular learning materials clearly but also promote greater EFL learning enjoyment for the students.</span></p> Kristian Florensio Wijaya Retno Muljani Retno Muljani Barli Bram Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-11-29 2020-11-29 3 2 17 26 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.7236 Critical thinking as learning and innovation skill in the 21st century https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/8778 <p>The essential element of encouraging national competitiveness in the revolutionary industry 4.0 is to prepare a more innovative learning system and to enhance the competence of graduates with 21st-century skills (Learning and Innovations Skills). There are 4Cs (Critical thinking, Creativity, Collaboration, and Communication) that can be implemented. Critical thinking is about problem-solving skills. The aim of this research is to determine the correlation of critical reading skills with critical thinking skills on 28 EFL students. The technique used to analyze the data is the correlation analysis using <em>r</em> Product Moment formula. The results showed a positive correlation between critical reading skills and critical thinking skills. Thus, it can be concluded that there is a correlation between critical reading strategy with critical thinking skills. To make this research better, the researcher suggests the next researcher to conduct such research by using experimental research which provides a strategy to improve students’ critical thinking.</p> Dina Merris Maya Sari Aulia Kusuma Wardhani Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-12-19 2020-12-19 3 2 27 34 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.8778 Teaching reading comprehension through SMART strategy to the tenth graders of vocational high school https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/8587 <p>The objective of this research was to find out whether or not it was significantly effective to teach reading comprehension through self-monitoring approach to reading and thinking (SMART) strategy to the tenth-grade students of SMK Pertanian Negeri 2 Tugumulyo. The method applied in this research was quantitative with the pre-experimental method. The total number of population was 130 students of the tenth-grade students of SMK Pertanian Negeri 2 Tugumulyo. The sample of this research had taken by using cluster random sampling. The number of the sample was 33 students of class X.2. The instrument of the research was in form of multiple-choice tests. The data were analyzed through four techniques: individual score, conversion based on minimum mastery criteria (MMC), normality testing, and paired t-test. Based on the result of data analysis, the writers found that there were: the students’ average score in the pre-test was 58.18 and the post-test was 76.36, normality testing in the pre-test was 2.0724 and the post-test was 4.471, and the result of paired t-test was 6.401, which was higher than 1.697 with 95% (0.05) significance level for one tailed-test. It means that the null hypothesis (Ho) was rejected and the alternative hypothesis (Ha) was accepted. In conclusion, it was significantly effective to teach reading comprehension through Self-monitoring approach to reading and thinking (SMART) strategy to tenth-grade students of SMK Pertanian Negeri 2 Tugumulyo.<strong></strong></p> Meilinda Astuti Dewi Syafitri Agus Triyogo Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-11-28 2020-11-28 3 2 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.8587 Content analysis of English textbooks for tenth grade of senior high school https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/8015 <p>The objectives of this study are to (1) discover whether or not the English textbooks for tenth grade fulfilled the criteria of a good textbook by Alan Cunningsworth, and (2) find out the strengths and weaknesses of the three textbooks used by tenth-grade students Senior High School. This research was conducted using content analysis because the data were collected from the content of textbooks. The object of this research was three textbooks. They are <em>Talk Active, Pathway to English, </em>and <em>Bahasa Inggris</em> for the tenth-grade senior high school. The research adapted Cunningsworth’s theory of a good textbook to evaluate these textbooks. The data were taken from document analysis and interview. The steps of the research were data collection, data reduction, data display, and giving a conclusion. The results of this research were (1) <em>Talk Active</em> fulfils four criteria of a good textbook by Cunningsworth; they are aims and approaches, topic, methodology, and political consideration. <em>Pathway to English </em>meets six criteria by Cunningsworth; aims and approaches, design and organization, topic, methodology, teachers’ book, and political consideration. <em>Bahasa Inggris </em>meets five criteria by Cunningsworth; aims and approaches, design and organization, topic, teachers’ book, and political consideration. (2) The strengths of <em>Talk Active</em> are in terms of appearance, activities, and materials. <em>Pathway to English </em>has strengths in terms of topics, activities, social and cultural context, and media. <em>Bahasa Inggris </em>has strengths in terms of activities, appearance, and communicative competence. On the other hand, <em>Talk Active</em> contains some weaknesses in terms of authentic language and content. <em>Pathway to English </em>present unattractive colouring, limited vocabulary, an expensive price, then <em>Bahasa Inggris</em> has weaknesses in terms of complete materials, less social and cultural context. It does not cover four basic skills in English.</p> Ida Vinny Sudaningsih Imam Ghozali Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-11-28 2020-11-28 3 2 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.8015 The evaluation of two eleventh-grade senior high school textbooks https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/8008 <p>The objectives of this research are to (1) describe the appropriateness of two English textbooks for the eleventh graders of senior high school based on Mukundan’s criteria, and (2) describe the strengths and weaknesses of the textbooks. This research is categorized as evaluation research as it aims at evaluating the appropriateness of two English textbooks. The data were collected through document analysis and to make sure the validity and readability of the research, therefore the researcher includes one of senior high school English teachers as the interrater reliability. The objects of the research are two English textbooks; <em>Pathway to English</em> and <em>Talk Active</em> for the eleventh graders of senior high school. The research found out that both textbooks <em>Pathway to English</em> and <em>Talk Active</em> meet the criteria of a good textbook. <em>PTE</em> textbook fully meets 11 criteria out of 14 criteria based on Mukundan’s criteria; the book in relation to syllabus and curriculum, methodology, supplementary materials, general content, listening, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar, and exercises. Meanwhile, <em>TA</em> textbook successfully fulfils 6 criteria out of 14 criteria based on Mukundan’s criteria; the book in relation to syllabus and curriculum, methodology, general content, writing, pronunciation and exercises. The results also reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each textbook. First, the <em>PTE</em> textbook has the strengths in the specification of the syllabus, various teaching-learning activities, activities address learning targets, supplementary material like a workbook and audio recording, teacher’s guide, simplicity and complexity of the tasks, tasks are supportive, appropriate listening tasks, the language use is authentic, speaking activities are designed to initiate students’ communicative practice and varied exercises. The weaknesses of <em>PTE</em> are the textbook does not provide pronunciation activity, the layout is less attractive, the price is expensive, it does not include various listening contexts such formal and informal contexts and also it has no a ready-made CD as support for listening skill. Meanwhile, the strengths of <em>TA</em> are the textbook is relevant to syllabus and curriculum, it provides workable activities which work well in most classroom situations, varied tasks which move from simple to complex, speaking activities are developed to improve students’ meaningful communication, reading texts are appropriate in length, writing tasks have achievable goals of improving students writing skills and the tasks are interesting, there is a number of new words across in each lesson, the textbook provides students with a glossary at the back of the textbook, pronunciation tasks are useful and interesting, exercises are adequate and they have clear instructions to understand. The main weakness of TA is that the textbook does not have an authentic audio recording or CD for listening skills, the listening activities are less appropriate and various listening contexts are not considered, individual, pairs and group work are not given in the same way in speaking practice, the price of the textbook is too expensive, it does not indicate efficient use of texts and visuals and overall, the textbook is less appropriate for the background knowledge and levels of students since it is provided balanced four basic language skills in it.</p> Delpianus Piong Ra. Hasti Robiasih Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-11-29 2020-11-29 3 2 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.8008 Developing storybook for elementary school in Lubuklinggau https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/7643 <p class="Default">The aim of this study was to find out the validity, practicality, and effectiveness of the developed storybook. Research and Development proposed by Branch (2009) consisting of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation (ADDIE) were used in developing the product. In the evaluation phase, formative evaluation proposed by Tessmer (1993) consisting of experts review, there were three experts reviewing the product, namely content expert, media expert and instructional design expert. Three students involved in the one-to-one evaluation, six students involved in the small group phase and eleven students in the field phase. To collect the data, questionnaires, interview, and a test was used. The collected data were analyzed qualitatively for the interview and quantitatively by using the average score for the questionnaires and percentage for the test. The developed product was valid after being evaluated in the expert review phase in terms of its content, media, and instructional design with average score of 4.1 categorized as highly valid. The product was also practical with average score of 4.6 in One-To-One and 4.0 in Small Group phase categorized as highly practical. The product was also had very high effectiveness which average score 91.2.</p> Ayu Oktaviani Dewi Syafitri Berti Arimbi Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-11-29 2020-11-29 3 2 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.7643 Teaching preposition by using scavenger hunt game https://jurnal.ustjogja.ac.id/index.php/ELP/article/view/7231 <p>This research aimed to find out the effectiveness of teaching preposition by using Scavenger Hunt Game to the eighth grade students of SMP Negeri 11 Lubuklinggau in academic year 2019/2020. There are two hypothesis in this research, the null hypothesis (Ho) which stated that it is not effective to teach preposition by using Scavenger Hunt Game to the eighth grade students of SMP Negeri 11 Lubuklinggau and the alternative hypothesis (Ha) which stated that it is effective to teach preposition by using Scavenger Hunt Game to the eighth grade students of SMP Negeri 11 Lubuklinggau. The pre-experimental method was applied in this research. There were 28 students treated as the sample of the research taken from class VIII.3 by using cluster random sampling. The data was collected by writing test. Moreover, the writer used SPSS 20 to analyzed the data. The data from the test was analyzed through individual score, comparison for Minimum Mastery Criteria (MMC), and used ready match t-test. From the data analyse, the writer found out that there was different between the students’ score before and after the treatment. The average score of pre-test was 47.68 and for the post-test was 75.89. Moreover, the result of match t-test was higher than the coefficients of t-table. The result of match t-test was 18.488 whereas the coefficients critical value of t-table was 1.703 for significant level 0.05 for df 27. It means that the alternative hypothesis (Ha) was accepted and the null hypothesis (Ho) was rejected. In other word, it was significantly effective to teach preposition by using Scavenger Hunt Game to the eighth grade students of SMP Negeri 11 Lubuklinggau in academic year 2019/2020.</p> Retno Rahmawati Syaprizal Syaprizal Yulfi Yulfi Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of English Language and Pedagogy 2020-11-29 2020-11-29 3 2 10.36597/jelp.v3i2.7231